And more 3D

Yet another Star Trek item that I’ve modelled.

In Star Trek: Nemesis, they created a new prop for the tricorder. The “flip phone” style of tricorder was replaced with one that more resembles a smart phone (albeit with a small part that flips open at the top).

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Dreamwidth Restored?

I think I’ve managed to restore cross-posting to Dreamwidth functionality. Dreamwidth recently changed the way it handles authentication, and my WordPress plugin broke. (Dreamwidth’s post includes the words “breaking changes to older clients” and, hey, it broke my older client. (Are there any newer clients, though?)

3D Practice

I’ve been trying to grow my skill with Blender, and a big part of my approach has been to re-model some stuff that I’d previously modelled in SketchUp.

And, yes, there’s more Star Trek stuff, ’cause that’s what I was mostly toying with when I was playing with SketchUp.

An early re-model was this wire-framed chair that shows up in some of the later TNG movies.

Blender has some different approaches to particular modelling tasks. In this case, I was using curves to get the frame of the chair. Basically, I draw out the lines that the frame follows, and then give those lines some substance, making it seem like it’s made of metal tubing.

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Half Lives, and Stones Unturned

Siobhan handed me a stack of disorganized family photos, letters, and random notes about birth- and death-dates of various relations. They’re from her mother’s family history files. Siobhan’s mother was interested in genealogy, but never really got to wrangle it in any organized way.

I told Sio that I’d take a stab at organizing the information, but it’s pretty chaotic. One of the first juicy bits I pulled out relates to a family of McFaddens. Someone had sent Sio’s mother a list of birth-dates, marriages and death-date hand-written on both sides of a sheet of lined paper.

Sadly, the dates appear to be fairly inconsistent with various documents that I’ve been able to look up. And there are other oddities, too.

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That’s a Real Thing?

Image of Alison Pill as Dr. Agnes Juroti from Star Trek: Picard looking surprised and asking 'That's a real thing?'

It me.

Blender 2.82 Released

Blender Day

Today is Blender Day. Version 2.82 should be released later today.

I’m pretty much a noob with Blender, but I decided a while back to switch from SketchUp to Blender for various reasons. I’ve grown some pretty good SketchUp experience, so it’s sad to fumble around with basic stuff again.

One of the earliest things I modelled in SketchUp was a table from Voyager. I chose it because it was mostly simple but had a few complicated bits. I was also lucky to find a good photo of one of the real props (which included some dimensions).

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Prince Andrew: One Degree of Separation

(CW: Pedophilia)

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Moar Trek

I’m still playing with Trek images. Here’s another character from our Trek RPG group:

There are some inconsistencies in the face that I wish were better, and the scale on her hand in lower left version bugs me.

But mostly I was playing with how the character looked in different eras.

I ended up not inking this piece: just coloured under pencils.

Twitter Banner

I decided I wanted to refresh my Twitter banner, and I decided on a “TO Comix and me” theme.

So the new banner includes a bunch of characters I created and/or co-created while working on various TO Comix books.

[a group of five human figures and two monsters, each of whom has appeared in a various TO Comix stories over the last few years]

Some of my co-creators include Xan Grey, Brenna Baines, Dee Williams and Meaghan Carter, and Alex Moore.

I wrote all of these characters, and it’s pretty seductive to think “before I came along, nothing about these characters existed, but then I put them in the story, and now they exist, and therefore I created them.” But the artist contribution to characters is pretty important and writers need to acknowledge their contribution.

I remember the early eighties, when “creator owned content” was a huge deal. Marvel and DC resisted the idea, because they wanted to claim ownership of all the characters created for them. (DC finally partially relented and credits creators of individual characters according to some byzantine rules). Marvel has little interest in acknowledging individual creators other than Stan Lee (and now, thanks to a lawsuit settlement that avoided a supreme court hearing, Jack Kirby). And they’re the big two. Most of the 80s-era creator-owned content publishers died out (although some of the stuff created in that era, like the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, continues to be thriving properties.